Belarusian Literature



The contemporary Belarusian literature finds itself in a situation of a strong competition with the volumes of book production in Russia and translations of the world literature. The term "national literature" in Belarus today is specific for its literary works, developing in the context of a formal bilingualism, which, in practice, represents the predominance of Russian language. As far as the genre structure is concerned, Belarus is not an exception in the world trends, aiming towards "light" genres (detective novels of all kind, fantasy novels, etc.). From the point of view of topics, in the "high quality" literature, prevailing topics usually are: World War II, Chernobyl, the Belarusian countryside, also with new motives appearing: general facts on ongoing processes and the current life in Belarusian cities. Besides that, experimentation in style and form is present.

What is significant for the contemporary Belarusian literature is the co-existence of two forms of literary works: "official" and "alternative". The first of the two is basically represented by members of The Association of Writers of Belarus led by Mikalai Charhinets. The second – The Association of Belarusian Writers. The poet and prose writer, Uladzimir Niakliaeu is considered the main opponent. However, the contemporary literature is rather a literature of "individualists", out of whom each creates their own art world and that is why hardly any institutional affiliation influences the creative work of real artists.

528 comments:

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Martin Svitka said...

In 1974 Vasil Bykov was awarded the State award of the USSR (for the story Live to See the Dawn, 1973). In 1980 he received the National Writer of Belarus Award and in 1984 was made a Hero of Socialist Labour. In 1986 he got the Lenin Award for the story Sign of Trouble.

Martin Svitka said...

Vasil Bykov also wrote a memoir about his life called ''The Long Road Home''

Martin Svitka said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Martin Svitka said...

Mr. Bykov never called himself a political exile. He spoke openly, however, about Mr. Lukashenko's government, which he frequently referred to as ''the regime.'' He objected to what he called Mr. Lukashenko's heavy-handedness with Belarussian society and contended that freedoms, hard-won during the struggles of the late 1980's and early 1990's, were being taken away. After he left Belarus, Mr. Bykov lived in Finland, then in Germany, and finally in the Czech Republic.

read more here

Martin Svitka said...

Mr. Bykov, called by some the Sakharov of Belarussian literature, drew as many as 50,000 people to Minsk's central streets for his funeral procession on June 25, said Ales Pashkevich, chairman of the Belarussian Writers Union.

Martin Svitka said...

Here you can find book written by V. Bykov.

Anonymous said...

Svetlana Alexijevic was born in Ukraine. Her father was Bellorussian and mather was Ukrainian. After demobilization of her father of army the family moved to Belarus. They lived in countryside. Both parents worked as teachers, likewise their ancestors.
Source: Láska je potrebná, ale ľúbiť človeka je ťažké, tvrdí nobelistka

Anonymous said...

Svetlana Alexijevic has already published speeches and other text as schoolgirl. In 1967 she began to study journalism at the University of Minsk. For works she has received several academic awards.
Source: Láska je potrebná, ale ľúbiť človeka je ťažké, tvrdí nobelistka

Anonymous said...

After graduation she got new job in regional newspaper in Brest region. At the same time she was also teaching in a rural schol. For a long time she could not decide,if she will continue in teaching as family tradition or will choose journalism as a profession. She started to work in newspaper in Minsk.
Source: Láska je potrebná, ale ľúbiť človeka je ťažké, tvrdí nobelistka

Anonymous said...

The Works till this time she focused on suffering of her characters. Therefore she wanted to take a look on a reversed perception of life in which she aimed at the eternal fight between good and evil. „Society will never be completely safe. We can only make it more safer with love,“ she said in an interview with the station Svoboda.
Source: Láska je potrebná, ale ľúbiť človeka je ťažké, tvrdí nobelistka

Anonymous said...

„So far I have written books about murders and dies of people. But this is not the whole life of humanity. From this time I will write about love, loving. I want to love a man although it is difficult. Everything is complicated,“ she said for her website.
Source: Láska je potrebná, ale ľúbiť človeka je ťažké, tvrdí nobelistka

Anonymous said...

Alexijevic gives important messages not only by books, in which she takes inspiration from true stories. Strong messages have also her stories. She often points at the fact that the responsibility for the bad or catastrophic routing has every individual in society, not only those who have an authority.
Source: Láska je potrebná, ale ľúbiť človeka je ťažké, tvrdí nobelistka

Anonymous said...

Return to Belarus had an emotional background for Alexijevic - incentives for the works she requests to obtain where she grown up. „I came back because I need to listen to our people. My books have the content from things and stories I hear from them,“ she said for the German television.
Source: Láska je potrebná, ale ľúbiť človeka je ťažké, tvrdí nobelistka

Erich Németh said...

Books of Svetlana Alexievich to get in Belarusian literature curriculum

Monika kopálová said...

Для фанатиков украинской литературе имеются 100 лучших шедевров украинской литературы : http://www.liveinternet.ru/tags/%F3%EA%F0%E0%E8%ED%F1%EA%E0%FF+%EB%E8%F2%E5%F0%E0%F2%F3%F0%E0/

Monika kopálová said...

Книги Светланы Алексиевич будут проходить на уроках белорусской литературы : http://belsat.eu/ru/news/knigi-svyatlany-aleksievich-buduts-prahodzits-na-urokah-belaruskaj-litaratury/

Monika kopálová said...

Проверьте или Знают ли белорусы про триумф Светланы Алексиевич? : http://belsat.eu/ru/vod_video/znayut-li-belorusy-pro-triumf-svetlany-aleksievich/

Monika kopálová said...

Современная белорусская литература: http://grodnonews.by/category/zhizn/news21723.html

Monika kopálová said...

Интересная статья о белорусской литературе. Я рекомендую прочитать. : http://kurapaty.info/ru/news-ru/item/belorusskaya-literatura-perezhila-chetyre-volny-terrora-nigde-v-mire-takogo-ne-bylo

Erich Németh said...

Everything you need to know about Svetlana Alexievich and her Nobel Prize Award from The Guardian

Erich Németh said...

Gomel to host Slavonic Literature Dazhynki from 30th of october till 2nd of november - The program of the festival will comprise presentations of printed publications of Belarusian, Russian and Ukrainian writers. In particular, there will be presented two books of poetry developed by the Union of Writers of Gomel Oblast, the Taganrog Literature Association Chaika and the Union of Writers of the Don.

Erich Németh said...

Belarus bookshop braves the state to publish Nobel winner's work - Underground publisher says it is risking regulations to translate Svetlana Alexievich’s novels into her home language - By The Guardian

Erich Németh said...

Interview of Ana Lunic´s with Svetlana Alexievich - Talking about some of her works, opinions on world politics, history and many more.

Erich Németh said...

The UN initiative UN70 Belarus Express for Sustainable Development Goals sets off on a journey around the country on 23 October. The train will bring more than 250 events to the regions.

Erich Németh said...

The 28th International Festival of Modern Choreography will be held in Belarus on 22-19 November, deputy director for special projects of the Vitebsk culture center Marina Romanovskaya told a press conference dedicated to the festival.

šimon Zvolensky said...

http://kamunikat.org/Belarusian_Review.html?pubid=27882

O tom prečo Hienadź Buraŭkin (28.august 1936- 30.máj 2014) dnes už nieje len skvelým básnikom.....

šimon Zvolensky said...

V próze Alesa Adamoviča "Moje ves lehla popelem" autor nesmierne bolestne zobrazuje utrpenie ľudí v Bielorusku počas Veľkej vlasteneckej vojny.

Katarína Borščová said...

С 1979 года начал публикацию собственных литературных произведений в печатных органах, таких, как газеты «Літаратура і мастацтва» и «Голас Радзімы», журналы «Полымя», «Беларусь», «Маладосць», «Крыніца». Личность Олега Бембеля как философа-публициста и поэта сложилась на рубеже 70-80-х годов. Работал на Белорусском телевидении в 1983—84 годах, был одним из авторов исторически познавательного телесценария «Архитектурное наследие Беларуси». С 1984 по 1986 год работал в Академии наук БССР.

Katarína Borščová said...

В 1979—81 годах осуществлял работу над своей книгой «Родное слово и морально-эстетический прогресс». Она была посвящена языковой ситуации в БССР и реальному положению белорусского языка в СССР. Так же автор отразил мнения самих белорусов о проблемах своего родного языка. Во время написания он проводил широкое анкетирование по этому вопросу, что тогда было запретной темой для советских социологов. Данные анкетирования были изложены в книге.

Katarína Borščová said...

В теоретической части своего труда Олег Бембель утверждал, основываясь на принципах экологии культуры, что в условиях усиления моральной и эстетической пауперизации (массового обнищания) человека, его родной язык, как наиболее универсальное и цельное выражение этоса и эстетики народа, может и должно стать могучим средством возрождения и сохранения духовности человека. Также в сочинении подвергалась резкой критике советская языковая политика, и отрицательно оценивалась работа деятелей культуры, ответственных за охрану белорусского языка.

Katarína Borščová said...

Сначала автор собирался издать книгу официально, но когда стало известно, что это невозможно, работу начали распространять в машинописном варианте. С помощью Алексея Кавки и белорусского историка Юрия Турёнка, живущего в Польше, удалось передать машинописный текст в Лондон, где в 1985 году он был издан Обществом белорусов Великобритании.

Katarína Borščová said...

http://budzma.org/literature/svyatlo-khrysciyanskay-paezii-alyeha-byembyelya.html

Patrik Burgár said...

One of faux pasfaux pas was last year in October during the presentation of Viktar Martsinovich´s novel called Mova in Hrodna. Shortly after start of presentation police, a person from Ministry of Emergency Situations and the official from the City Council appeared in the room, where presentation was held. As he said: "The meeting was held on account of the published book, which was legal and sold in all the stores, and, sorry, sold out in huge numbers for Belarus. I also said the meeting was being held on the day when the president met with Belarusian writers."

Iveta Kureková said...

Victor Martinovich
He was born 9-th of September 1977, in Oshmiany (Belarus).
Education: 1994-1999 – Belarussian State University, Journalism department, student. 1999-2002 – BSU's Postgraduate courses, history of journalism studies. 2002 - Postgraduator, name of the thesis – Representation of Vitebsk's art avant-garde in Soviet press of 1920-s. 2008 Defended PhD at Vilnius (Lithuania) on the history of journalism.

Iveta Kureková said...


Book of Victor Martinovich – Паранойя book
I tis his first novel.It has been positively reviewed by New York Times Book Reviewin 2009 and 2013. In 2013 North Western university Press (Chicago) published English translation of Paranoia, prepared by Diane Nemec Ignashev, Carleton’s professor of Russian literature.

Iveta Kureková said...

Timothy Snyder is the Housum Professor of History at Yale and his share about Paranoia from Victor Martinovich. more

Iveta Kureková said...

Third novel of Victor martinovich - Sphagnum, was presented to public 2013 and surprisingly not only appeared on the book shelves of state-owned shops, but also became best-selling novel in Belarussian language.
Sphagnum on web:
Books from Belarus

Iveta Kureková said...

Виктор Мартинових Сфагнум

Iveta Kureková said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Iveta Kureková said...

Dr. Victor Martinovich in his upcoming book Rodina: Marc Chagall in Vitebsk in 1914-1920, available in August from The European Humanities University (EHU) Press.
You can see discussion on YouTube

Iveta Kureková said...

Discussion with Victor martinovich on Culture.pl

Marcela Šmigurová said...

Svetlana Alexievich
Her full name is Svetlana Alexandrovna Alexievich. She is Belarusian journalist and non-fiction prose writer, writing in Russian. She was born 31 May 1948 in Stanislaviv (Ukrainian SSR). She won Nobel Prize in 2015 “for her polyphonic writings, a monument to suffering and courage in our time.“

Marcela Šmigurová said...

Svetlana’s father was Belarusian and her mother Ukrainian. She grew up in Belarus, after finishing school she worked as a reporter in several local newspapers before graduating from Belarusian State University (1972) and becoming a correspondent for the literary magazine Neman in Minsk (1976)

Marcela Šmigurová said...

Alexievich wrote War’s Unwomanly Face on 1985. More than two millions copies were sold. The novel is made up of monolouges of women in the World War II.

Marcela Šmigurová said...

Another book by Svetlana Alexievich – The Last Witnesses: the Book of Unchildlike Stories describes memories of children during World War II.

Marcela Šmigurová said...

Svetlana also published Enchanted With Death in 1993. This book is about attempted and completed suicides due to the downfall of the Soviet Union.

Marcela Šmigurová said...

Svetlana’s books were not published by Belarusian state-owned publishing houses after 1993. private publishers published only two of her books: Voices From Chernobyl (1999) and Second-hand Time (2013).

Marcela Šmigurová said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Marcela Šmigurová said...

More about Svetlana Slexievich is on her website - http://www.alexievich.info/indexEN.html

Anikó Csóka said...

Khadanovich is a teacher of literature in Belarusan State University and Belarusan National Liceum of Humanities. Head of Translation Workshop in Belarusan Colegium (Minsk). An organizer of Literature Contest Ya Maju Tvor for Belarusan schoolchildren.

Anikó Csóka said...

Svetlana Alexievich
Her full name is Svetlana Alexandrovna Alexievich. She is Belarusian journalist and non-fiction prose writer, writing in Russian. She was born 31 May 1948 in Stanislaviv (Ukrainian SSR). She won Nobel Prize in 2015 “for her polyphonic writings, a monument to suffering and courage in our time.“

Anikó Csóka said...

Svetlana’s father was Belarusian and her mother Ukrainian. She grew up in Belarus, after finishing school she worked as a reporter in several local newspapers before graduating from Belarusian State University (1972) and becoming a correspondent for the literary magazine Neman in Minsk

Anikó Csóka said...

Alexievich wrote War’s Unwomanly Face on 1985. More than two millions copies were sold. The novel is made up of monolouges of women in the World War II

Anikó Csóka said...

Another book by Svetlana Alexievich – The Last Witnesses: the Book of Unchildlike Stories describes memories of children during World War II.

Anikó Csóka said...

Svetlana also published Enchanted With Death in 1993. This book is about attempted and completed suicides due to the downfall of the Soviet Union.

Anikó Csóka said...

Svetlana’s books were not published by Belarusian state-owned publishing houses after 1993. private publishers published only two of her books: Voices From Chernobyl (1999) and Second-hand Time (2013).

Pavol kováč said...

Я́нка Мавр (настоящее имя — Ива́н Миха́йлович Фёдоров) был белорусским писателем. Писал прозу не только для детей, но и для взрослых. В 1925 опубликовал научно фантастическую повесть «Человек идёт».
Боллее подробную информацию из жизни автора можете найти по этому сайту: https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Янка_Мавр
Также посмотрите интересное видео: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbcOPBVK8ws
В честь его имени названа улица в Минске.

Pavol kováč said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Pavol kováč said...

Андрей Егорович Макаёнок был известным белорусским писателем и драматургом. Свои первые стихотворения начал писать уже в школе. Позже, во время войны, писал записки в своём дневнике.
Первым его серьёзным произведением была песня “На досвітку”. В ней рассказывается о борьбе французских рабочих за свои права.
Более подробную информацию из его жизни можете найти по этому сайту: https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Макаёнок,_Андрей_Егорович
В честь этого писателя названа улица в минске.

Pavol kováč said...

Ива́н Па́влович Ме́леж (белор. Іван Паўлавіч Мележ) был белорусским писателем, прозаиком, публицистом и драматургом. Самые его известные романы: «Люди на болоте» и «Дыхание грозы». Романы посвящены людям белорусской деревни 20-30-х годов.
Больше информации об авторе вы можете узнать по этому адресу: http://ivanmeleg.ru/
В честь его имени названа улица в Минске.

Pavol kováč said...

Пи́мен Емелья́нович Па́нченко (белор. Пімен Емяльянавіч Панчанка) был белорусским поэтом. Начал писать ещё в юности. Впервые его стихи «Ураджайнае» и «Моладзі» были опубликованы в 1934 году. Кроме стихов писал различные эссе и воспоминания.
Более подробную информацию из его жизни можете найти по этому адресу: https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Панченко,_Пимен_Емельян..
В честь его имени названа улица в Минске.

Lucia Chuda said...

For those who were interested in my posts about Victor Martinovich´s novel Paranoia, on this website you can read this dystopia.

Lucia Chuda said...

From the Reviews
"Along with the recognizable topography of Minsk, Paranoia also has a literary topography filled with references, quotations and artifacts. (...) Paranoia has an energy and a nerve of its own -- a refreshing sign that cultural life in Belarus has not been defeated. Yet the danger for a writer working in an oppressive regime is not only that his book will be banned, but also that one day it may be allowed. The K.G.B. can fashion a good biography for a writer; it cannot write a good book for him." - Arkady Ostrovsky, The New York Times Book Review

"Both dense and intense, the novel, full of passionate intelligence and incisive wit, defies easy pigeonholing." - Publishers Weekly

"Indeed, Paranoia may not be the most appropriate title for Martinovich's novel: the hero's predicament and his interpretation of what is happening is not so different from the perfectly sane analysis of Belarus given in the foreword by Timothy Snyder. (...) Martinovich's achievement is to show how, in such an 'Absurdistan', a hole can open up in the ground and drop you into hell. (...) The translator hasn't shrugged: she's put her shoulder to the wheel. But some aspects are untranslatable. (...) Nevertheless, whether read in the original or in translation, Paranoia is an exciting novel that is not easy to forget." - Donald Rayfield, Times Literary Supplement

Pavol kováč said...

Алоиза Степановна Пашкевич была белорусской писательницей, поэтэссой, прозаиком и актрисой. Известно, что любила природу и свою родину, именно этим и были мотивы её творчества. Написала сборники «Хрэст на свабоду» и «Скрыпка беларуская», также книги для детей «Першае чытанне для дзетак беларусаў», «Лемантар», «Гасцінец для малых дзяцей».
Более подробную информацию вы можете найти по этому адресу: https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Пашкевич,_Алоиза_Степан..
В честь её имени названа улица в Минске.

Pavol kováč said...

Бори́с Ви́кторович Плато́нов, родился в 1903 году. Был советским актёром театра и кино. В 1961—1963 годах являлся художественным руководителем театра. Умер он в 1967 году. Был похоронен в Минске на Восточном кладбище.
Более подробную информацию вы можете найти по этому адресу: https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Платонов,_Борис_Викторо..
В честь его имени названа в Минскеулица.

Anonymous said...

„Doba z druhej ruky“ is a great book by Svetlana Alexijevic. In the book she describes the end of communist regime and the fall of Soviet imperium which was a great shock, disappointment, frustration and disorientation for people living in Russia.
Source: Doba z druhé ruky

Anonymous said...

The book is a mosaic of real voices, which A. recorded during the interviews with people in which they talked about soviet system, how they killed and died for its idea.
Source: Doba z druhé ruky

Anonymous said...

In book she writes about secrets of communism, Stalin‘s gulags, wars in general and Chernobyle‘s disaster... she describes opinions which lead to traum of society.
Source: Doba z druhé ruky

Anonymous said...

Heroes of this great book think that the peek of freedom was the august of 1991, when thousads of Russians came to the streets, stood in front of tanks which tried to „defeat“ democratic reforms. It was a time of a big hope.
Source: Doba z druhé ruky

Anonymous said...

Russians thought that capitalism is a big supermarket but suddenly in next day they woken up to country where were social problems, anarchy, inflation, criminality, corruption and the economic fall in general.
Source: Doba z druhé ruky

Anonymous said...

The book tries to show why Russia is not able to become modern democratic and modern country in a short time. It also describes why autocrats like Putin are very popular (85% of popularity) and why Russians think that Stalin was a great man (70% people share this opinion).
Source: Doba z druhé ruky

Anonymous said...

Svetlana Alexijevic got a lot of prizes for this book. In France she won the prize for the best Book of the year 2013 and she got Prix Médicis 2013, in Germany she got a prize by Booksellers 2013... The author was also the laureat of many others prizes in USA, Russia, Poland, Sweden...
Source: Doba z druhé ruky

Pavol kováč said...

Франци́ск Луки́ч Скори́на родился в Полоцке около 1490 года. Был писателем и переводчиком, свою деятельность начал в Праге, где перевёл около 23 книг Библии на старобелорусский язык. Его творчество оказало большое влияние на духовную культуру Беларуси. Его имя носят университет в Гомеле, центральная библиотека, педагогическое училище, гимназия № 1 в Полоцке, гимназия № 1 и улица в Минске. Умер Скорина около 1551 года, точная дата смерти неизвестна.
Более подробную информацию из его жизни вы можете найти по этому адресу: https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Скорина,_Франциск#.D0.A..

Lucia Chuda said...

Another review of the book Paranoia
The country Paranoia is set in may not be explicitly identified by name, but it is closely based on the author's native Belarus (and its protagonist's best-known work is a collection of essays titled: The Country whose Name begins with B). The: "Head of State, Commander in Chief, Minister of State Security Nikolai Mikhailovich Muraviov" -- who plays a significant role in the novel -- is known as the: "last dictator in Europe", just as the actual Belarusian leader Alexander Lukashenko is, and the states they rule over truly are totalitarian.
...

Erich Németh said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Erich Németh said...

Writers from Belarus, Ukraine, Russia partaking in literature festival in Gomel. The festival has begun today, and will be active till 6th of November.

Erich Németh said...

The ninth international festival of Slavic literature will officially open in Gomel on 5 November. Attending the event will be over 60 writers and poets from Belarus and other countries of the CIS (or known as Commonwealth of Independent States).

Erich Németh said...

The international festival of Slavic literature was founded in Gomel in 2007.

Since then, it has become a major cultural event for Gomel Oblast. The number of its participants is growing from year to year. The festival is aimed at supporting young talented poets and writers, promoting Belarusian literature, and exchanging experience with Russian and Ukrainian colleagues.

Erich Németh said...

Here are some facts, you have to know about belorusian Nobel Prize Winner, Svetlana Alexievich.

Erich Németh said...

Elite of Elites in Literature - Alexievich is the 14th woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature—it has been awarded 107 times. Half of those wins have been in the past 25 years.

Erich Németh said...

Struggle of the youth - In 1983 Alexievich completed her bestseller, War's Unwomanly Face, which gathers the voices of 200 Soviet women who went to war in 1941. It was destroyed by the Communist Party for "de-glorification of the heroic Soviet woman." Two years later, Gorbachev took office and the political climate changed. The book was finally published and has since sold more than 2 million copies.




Erich Németh said...

She speaks for the people
Each of her books is a distillation of interviews with 500 to 700 different people.
- "I don’t ask people about socialism, I ask about love, jealousy, childhood, old age,” Alexievich writes. “Music, dances, hairstyles. The myriad sundry details of a vanished way of life. This is the only way to chase the catastrophe into the framework of the mundane and attempt to tell a story." -

Lucia Chuda said...

Виктор Мартинович
Недавно его рассказ «Табу» попал в литературную рецензию The New York Times и заслужил несколько самых лестных эпитетов. В сознании же белорусов он -- автор, как оказалось после 19 декабря, не такой уж и утопии «Паранойя». Неудивительно, что и сам писатель для него -- это псих и «задрот», а писательство -- психоаналитический сеанс. Заместитель редактора «БелГазеты», доктор философии (PhD), руководитель академического департамента политических наук ЕГУ Виктор Мартинович о Беларуси Лукашенко в программе "Наедине со всеми".
(посмотрите интервью)

Pavol kováč said...

Васи́лий Никола́евич Тя́пинский был белорусским писателем, поэтом и переводчиком. Занимался переводом и изданием Евангелия. Известно, что Василий любил родину и защищал родный язык.
Более подробную инфориацию из его жизни можете найти по этому адресу: https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Тяпинский,_Василий_Нико..
В Минске в честь его имени названа улица.

Pavol kováč said...

Михась Чарот был белорусским писателем и поэтом. В 1917 году окончил гимназию в городе Молодечно, после чего был призван в армию, где и написал первые стихотворения. Через год возвратился на родину, где участвовал в партизанском движении. До 1930 года Михась Чарот был редактором газеты «Савецкая Беларусь». В Минске, Молодечно и Руденске в честь поэта названы улицы.
Более подробную информацию из его жизни вы можете найти по этому адресу: https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Михась_Чарот

Pavol kováč said...

Фёдор Михайлович Янковский был белорусским писателем и филологом. Работал секретарем редакции районной газеты«Сацыялістычная вёска».С 1936 года начал заниматься литературной деятельностью. Более подробную информацию из его жизни вы можете найти по этому адресу:https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Янковский,_Фёдор_Михайл..
В Минске тоже названа улица в честь его имени.

Pavol kováč said...

В Минске, на улице Держинская, разрабатывается хороший проект: курсы чтения для подростков. Это цикл встреч для молодых людей, где будут обсуждать важные вещи, читая хорошие современные книги. Создатели этого проекта хотят объяснить те самые темы, на которые дома не говорят. Например, курение, наркотики, ранний секс, насилие в семье и школе, детская жестокость… То, что о них молчат, ещё не значит, что они исчезли. Молодых людей хотят научить, как правильно надо относиться к этим темам на основе обсуждения книг с этой тематикой.

Pavol kováč said...

http://www.belarus.by/ru/about-belarus/architecture/n.. по этому адресу вы можете найти информацию о самом большом собрании по количеству белорусской литературы. В 2006 году было открыто новое здание Национальной библиотеки. Эта библиотека построена в современном стиле, и здесь не отсуствуют новейшие технологии сохранения книг.

Pavol kováč said...

День белорусской письменности. Этот день проходит в исторических городах и касается не только литераруры, а также культуры, науки и книгопечатания. Это день, когда белорусы гордятся своей культурой.
Более подробную информацию об этом празднике вы можете найти по этому адресу: http://www.belarus.by/ru/about-belarus/culture/den_be..

Pavol kováč said...

2012 год в Белоруссии был годом книги, чтобы повысить интерес людей к чтению и сохранить известные и малоизвестные белорусские книги. Многие считают этот шаг полезным в рамках нового разрыва литературной деятельности. Также это для многих является жестом, который значит, что литература для государства важна, и в ближайшем будущем её будут поддерживать.

Iveta Kureková said...

Victor Martinovich - Paranoia
2014 German translation of Paranoia is published by Voland und Quist (translation performed by Thomas Weiler.

Iveta Kureková said...

Victor Martinovich and his work experience (in journalism): Present time – May 2002. Deputy editor-in-chief of weekly newspaper «BelGazeta».Columnist of BelGazeta. Has a popular Weblog at martinovich.livejournal.com May 2002 – September 2000. Chief of political department of «BelGazeta». September 2000 – September 1998. Chief of political department of Daily news-paper Belorusskaya Delovaya Gazeta (also known as «BDG»). September 1998 – April 1995. Journalist of economical department of BDG.

Iveta Kureková said...

At the year 2011 Victor Martinovich published his second novel Cold paradise. Text was written in Belarussian language and appeared at the Internet only (author stated, that he is “tired” of playing “to ban or not to ban game” with the state). It pioneered the way to non-paper editions for Belarussian writers and until now remains the most downloaded example of fiction writings in Belarussian segment of Internet.

Iveta Kureková said...

Forth Martinovich novel, Mova, is appearing Autumn 2014 both on paper and at the Internet.

Iveta Kureková said...

Nowadays have international rights on Paranoia from Victor Martinovich are sold for Germany, Finland, Sweden, USA, on Sphagnum sold for Germany.

Iveta Kureková said...

Review of Paranoia from Victor Martinovich in New York Times

Iveta Kureková said...

Magazine about Eastern Europe: New Eastern Europe

Anonymous said...

Video recording of statements of laureats for Nobel Prize for Literature in 2015 -
https://youtu.be/rmyoboDkWjI

Anonymous said...

Interview with Svetlana Alexijevic after receiving the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2015 -
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vm1GLOklTyA

Anonymous said...

Book „Doba z druhej ruky“ is available as an e-book at the local distributor Alza Media in Czech language-
https://www.alza.sk/media/doba-z-druhe-ruky-d3067296.htm

Anonymous said...

Short inteview with Svetlana Alexijevic on the official website of the Nobel Prizes -
http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/2015/alexievich-interview.html

Anonymous said...

Writers festival in Prague organized a meeting with Svetlana Alexijevic -
http://archiv.ihned.cz/c1-64724630-svetlana-alexijevicova-nobelova-cena-profil

Anonymous said...

Alexijevic received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2015 mainly due to the older book „Černobyľská modlitba“ - http://magazin.aktualne.cz/kultura/nobelova-cena-za-literaturu-2015/r~1d420c126d0611e58f1e002590604f2e/

Anonymous said...

The head of the Ukrainian Literature Library in Moscow is in house prison. Allegedly had anti-Russian Bandera books. Russian writers and also new Nobel Prize winner for literature Svetlana Alexijevičová vindicated her.
Source: Knihy vás môžu v Rusku dostať do väzenia ako za sovietskych čias

Erich Németh said...

"Communism had a crazy plan - to remake old man, the ancient Adam. And it has succeeded ... That's about the only thing that was a success. For more than seventy years in the laboratory of Marxism-Leninism, it has managed to create a special type of man - homo soveticus..." - Excerpt from the book "Second hand time " by Svetlana Alexievich

Erich Németh said...

Second hand time represents the final, the fifth book of the famous artistic documentary cycle Svetlana Alexievich´ Voices from Big Utopia. It is a sort of guided consciences of people who lived through some part of her life in the former Soviet Union and who have experienced or are experiencing reality after its disintegration, Slovak Daily SME published a few snippets of text.

Erich Németh said...

Special book, winning numerous prestigious prizes (in France triumphed in a poll of the magazine Lire for Best Book of the Year 2013 and won the Prix Médicis 2013 in Germany, the Peace Prize of the German Booksellers 2013, was being sold at the Frankfurt fair, the author herself (Svetlana Alexievich) won other major awards in Germany, Sweden, Poland, France, Russia and the United States. Second hand time

Erich Németh said...

The author's works are specific in that they are based on interviews with different people and focused on human destinies in specific historical periods. Alexievich gave herself for the past 30 to 40 years of Soviet and post-Soviet era - to the women and men who survived the tragedy in Chernobyl, the Soviet-Afghan War and the fall of the Soviet Union.

Erich Németh said...

Member of the commission for Nobel Prize Sara Danius after the results said she read books of Belarusian writer and it created strong emotional experience. "Svetlana Alexievich writes about historical events, but these in themselves are not important," Daily SME quoted. She added that historical events are merely a pretext for a writer to examine and describe the lives of specific individuals. "Alexievich captures the stories of small people and also maintaines their original language".

Erich Németh said...

In the Czech translation you can read a book by Svetlana Alexievich Voices from Chernobyl (2002), which was created based on interviews with hundreds of people affected by the nuclear disaster. Stories about women, who despite the warnings of medical teams held their dying husbands in their hands, even though they would end up affected by radiation.

Erich Németh said...

By the end of 2015, Slovak translation of one of Alexievich´s books - War's unwomanly face (1984) is coming out, which brings interviews with thousands of Soviet women soldiers fighting in the Great Patriotic War.

Marianna Olejarová said...

The centre of Belarusian cultural and political activities is in Polish city – Bialystok. There lives a strong minority of Belarusians – around 50 thousand with national and additional 50-100 thousand with weakened and mixed identity. The whole population of Bialystok is almost 300 thousand according to the last cenzus. The city is situated in the north-eastern part of Poland, almost 60 kilometres from the polish-belarus border, 350 km from Minsk and 300 km from Vilnius. The way Belarusian culture influences the city and whole region is for example publishing a weekly magazine Niva in Belarusian language , airing radio Racyja and tv programmes. Moreover on the University of Bialystok there is the Department of Belarusian Culture.

Marianna Olejarová said...

Belarus. Love and apathy (BIAŁORUŚ. MIŁOŚĆ I MARAZM), is a book written by Hanna Kondratiuk, published in Bialystok in 2013 by Fundacja Sasiedzi. The book of reportages was made by the author while travelling through small cities and villages of Belarus. There are conversations with Belarusians, talking about political history, identity od Eastern nation. Blue sky, houses, people brings you picture of Belarus – sad and happy at the same time. The reading leaves the reader with questions like – What is the future of Belarus? What direction will take Lukashenko´s state on? What comes to the fore – love or apathy?
The review of the book in Polish language

Marianna Olejarová said...

HANNA KONDRATIUK was born in Kutłówce na Podlasiu. She graduated from Warszaw University. Since 1993, she works in weekly magazine of Belarusian minority in Poland – Niva. She is the author of many reportages from Belarus, Ukraine and mainly from Podlasie. Hanna has written four books: „W stronę Tarasiewicza" (two publications – 2002 and 2004), „Carskaja Tryzna" (2007), „Dziadowskie tournée z Anatolem S." (2010) and „Białoruś. Miłość i marazm” (2013). Moreover, she recorded ancient songs and stories " Žuryłasie Kateryna " (2005) . Since 1995 she leads journalistic workshops for children and youth , so-called " Sustreczy Zorki "( e-zorka.pl ) by which she edits the addition of " Zorka " in " Niva " . She works with literary magazines in Poland and Belarus and lives in Bialystok, Poland.
source

Marianna Olejarová said...

The highest authority in politics, sport and culture of Belarus, the one and only president – Alexander Lukashenko and the people who since 1994 live in the country with ill system, waiting for the change.
“System Belarus“ was written by former political prisoner Andrzej Poczobut - Belarusian and Polish journalist, blogger and activist of the Polish minority in Belarus from Grodno. In the past he worked for these Belarusian media - Pahonia, Dien, Miestnoje Wriemia, Narodnaja Volia, Głos znad Niemna and Magazyn Polski. Andrzej currently serves as a head of the Council of the UPB (Union of Poles in Belarus), an organization recognized by the Belarusian authorities as illegal. The book was published in 2013, the year he was exempted from serving the sentence for defaming the President of Belarus.
Agata Wierzbowska-Miazga (Centre for Eastern Studies) said:
“Poczobut´s book is lightly written story about difficult cases. Journalistic pen , skillful selection of facts , statements of direct witnesses make "System Belarus" reads like a sensational story of the struggle for power and its maintenance. The only pitty is that this is a true story ...”

Marianna Olejarová said...

Victor Martinovich, in Vilnius, presented the book – a study on the one of the most prominent artists of XXth century in Belarus. To write this scientific study, journalist was gathering information for 15 years. The book is called «Радзіма: Марк Шагал у Віцебску» (Homeland: Marc Chagall in Vitebsk.)
source

Marianna Olejarová said...

„It is important so that the world could see what has been written by political prisoners and repressed,” said political prisoner Ales Bialiatski in the article published on November 15 – on the Day of the Imprisoned Writer. Ales spends his free time (which is according his words approximately an hour and half a day) for writing. He mentiones, that it is important to think about establishing a library of Belarusian prison literature, where would be collected the works of those writers who wrote in jail. Library like this might serve as a school of moral and moral example for many Belarusians and future generations. The idea of the library is, in my opinion, really good and almost required looking back to dozens imprisoned writers.

source

Marianna Olejarová said...

This is not an essay about a book or an author even though I am mentioning them. This is the essay about phenomenas which are currently present on Belarus literary scene. Sometimes, we - readers are so excited about a plot of some book, we are impressed by a hero of a book or by style an author uses in his or her book. Yes, it is why we read. But there is a special thing about Belarusian literature ( I mean, mostly contemporary – as in my essay I mention that one) – I am impressed already before reading. Why? Let´s look on some conditions in which some Belarusian books grow up. And maybe you will share the impression with me.
The first book I mention on the blog is "Enlightened by the Belarusian Issue." It is a book of critical essays written by Ales Bialiatski – political prisoner and the head of Belarus Human Rights Centre Viasna, Vice president of International Federation of Human Rights. He started to write this book in 2011 before arrest and kept on the work during his imprisonment by sending texts in letters. Through this book the author brought for the first time the term "Belarusian prison literature" into modern Belarusian literary studies. Moreover he writes about almost unkown author from 1920s’ Khviados Shynkler who perished in WWII and in the book are also reviews on different poetry works such as “Stremka” written by his friend Siarzhuk Sys. Palina Stsepanenka who composed the book describes Bialatski’s reaction after its publication: ‘‘On 6 February I received a letter from Ales, he writes that the publication of a book was a cultural shock for him, as he has never even dreamed that there would be such a book.‘‘ But the fate of book continues. See what happened after the seizing of 40 copies of the book at the Belarusian - Lithuanian border crossing “Kamenny Loh” in July 2013 from human rights activist Tatsiana Reviaka, the book was requested for examination and the expert committee came to conclusion that the work ‘‘could damage the image of the Republic of Belarus.‘‘ So the book is finally prohibited and marked as something what could damage the image of the Republic of Belarus. That´s so sad, but not something unexpectable in Belarus.
For example a book „Paranoia,“ written by contemporary writer, journalist and also teacher at European Humanities University in Vilnius – Victor Martinovich suddenly disapperead from Belarusian book market after few days. The reason is probably similiar as in case of Bialiatski. The authorities must be careful and let anyone to damage the image of the country. Apart from this book Victor Martinovich has written Cold Paradise , Sphagnum and Mova (on the links you can see photos from presentations of the books) And his recent acitivity was when in Vilnius presented the book – a study on the one of the most prominent artists of XXth century in Belarus – Marc Chagall. To write this scientific study, Martinovich was gathering information for 15 years. The book is called «Радзіма: Марк Шагал у Віцебску» (Homeland: Marc Chagall in Vitebsk). So looking at pomer he published, we may claim he´s been „in safe,“ yet.
The next book is not fiction but a political biography. It was written by Alyaksandr Fyaduta who says that he is proud of having written a banned book. Although the book was published in Moscow and for a month was on the top of political biography charts, it was not possible to get it in Belarusian bookshops. Moreover anything published under the name of former political prisoner requires special examination on the Belarus border. So in this case we meet author who is thanks to his writing activity seen as “persona non grata” in Belarus.

Marianna Olejarová said...

In Belarus aslo happens that not just Belarusian authors are put jail or at least have banned some book. The living testimony is former political prisoner and activist of the Polish minority in Belarus - Andrzej Poczobut originally from Poland. He is the author of “System Belarus“. The book was published in 2013, the year after he was exempted from serving the sentence for defaming the President of Belarus. Andrzej currently serves as a head of the Council of the UPB (Union of Poles in Belarus), an organization recognized by the Belarusian authorities as illegal.

Looking at these examples, we may see that it is not easy to be a writer in Belarus whether you write fiction or non-ficition, whether you are Belarus or Polish, when it is necessary the authorities can always find something against you or your piece of work. The prohibition and controls are present. That´s why I decided to find out more about Belarus literary activity abroad. I did not have to „go far“ when I started to read about Polish city Bialystok - the centre of Belarusian cultural and political activities in Poland. There lives a strong minority of Belarusians – around 50 thousand with national and additional 50-100 thousand with weakened and mixed identity. The whole population of Bialystok is almost 300 thousand according to the last cenzus. The city is situated in the north-eastern part of Poland, almost 60 kilometres from the polish-belarus border, 350 km from Minsk and 300 km from Vilnius. The way Belarusian culture influences the city and whole region is for example publishing a weekly magazine Niva in Belarusian language , airing radio Racyja and tv programmes. Moreover on the University of Bialystok there is the Department of Belarusian Culture.
Apart from general information about Bialystok I wanted to find some concrete piece of work created here. I found a book „Belarus. Love and apathy“(BIAŁORUŚ. MIŁOŚĆ I MARAZM) written by Hanna Kondratiuk, published in Bialystok in 2013 by Fundacja Sasiedzi. The book of reportages was made by the author while travelling through small cities and villages of Belarus. There are conversations with Belarusians, talking about political history, identity od Eastern nation. Blue sky, houses, people brings you picture of Belarus – sad and happy at the same time. The reading leaves the reader with questions like – What is the future of Belarus? What direction will take Lukashenko´s state on? What comes to the fore – love or apathy? (The review of the book in Polish language) So it is concrete example of work interested in Belarus created in Bialystok.

Marianna Olejarová said...

In the end I just want to add some statements about Belarusian literature. First was written by Pavał Kaściukievič, Art-director and International projects' coordinator of Kniharnia Łohvinaŭ Publishing House and Literary Center,in the article Go Bisons! 693 words about Belarusian literature. „Literature in Belarus is a political dialogue prohibited in modern Belarusan society. It is an artistic battle with the State ideology and lack of freedom, a balancing act between East and West, serving as a refuge for tender hearts confronted with a hard reality. At the same time, Belarusan literature opposes aesthetic censorship; it is a distinctive observation of the human soul, a journey in the mostly unfavourable conditions of Eastern Europe“, Moreover, Publishing House Łohvinaŭ in recent past went through hard times when government „gifted“ it with fine around 60 000 dollars. The bookstore survived thanks to crowdfunded campaign. The next expressed Ales Bialiatski on the Day of the Imprisoned Writer (November 15): „It is important so that the world could see what has been written by political prisoners and repressed,” and he came with an idea of establishing a library of Belarusian prison literature, where would be collected the works of those writers who wrote in jail. Library like this might serve as a school of moral and moral example for many Belarusians and future generations. The last was said by Agata Wierzbowska-Miazga (Centre for Eastern Studies) when she was describing Poczobut´s book:“ It is lightly written story about difficult cases. Journalistic pen, skillful selection of facts , statements of direct witnesses make "System Belarus" reads like a sensational story of the struggle for power and its maintenance. The only pitty is that this is a true story ...”
Through these statements and examples from Belarus and neighboring Poland I tried to draft the situation of Belarus literary life. In the beginning I mentioned that I am impressed already before reading a concrete book. The reason of my impression is the story hidden by these particualar books and many other which I did not mention. When I realize that something like this is happening in the 21st century, in Europe where we are used to present our opinions and we are taught to think critically, to read stories of these Belarusian books sounds like ficiton.

Lucia Chuda said...

Victor Martinovich. Social dystopias as reflection of Belarusian reality.
(Lucia Chudá, 2boRV)

Introduction

Dystopia (from Ancient Greek: δυσ-, "bad, ill", and Ancient Greek: τόπος, "place, landscape") is a very specifical type of literature. It is defined as:
1. An imaginary place or state in which the condition of life is extremely bad, as from deprivation, oppression, or terror.
2. A work describing such a place or state: "dystopias such as Brave New World" (Times Literary Supplement).(1)

From Orwell´s dystopias Animal farm, 1984, trought Bely´s Argonauts or Bryusov´s The Republic of the Southern Cross(2), we will travel to Belarus to meet one contemporary writer – Victor Martinovich.
In my work I will write about this writer and about his works-dystopias and also try to describe his books and show some important points which may mean something more than just words.
I will also try to point out reflection in his dystopias which may be influanced by his homeland - Belarus.









_______________________________________________________________________________
1 The free dictionary by Farlex: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/dystopia
2 ELIÁŠ, A. a kol. Ruská literatúra 18.-21. storočia, Bratislava: VEDA, 2013. 131 s. ISBN 970-80-224- 1344-2

Lucia Chuda said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lucia Chuda said...

Short biography of Victor Martinovich
Victor Martinovich, who was born in 1977 in Ashmyany, is belurussian contemporary writer, journalist and art historian. In 1994 he started to study at Belarussian State University(BSU), journalism department. After five years of studying at the university, he has been participating in BSU’s Postgraduate courses, history of criticism he studies during three years.
He developed thesis on Vitebsk’s avant-garde of 1920-s, its social and cultural context and Soviet media criticism. Unfortunately, he wasn’t able to defend PhD in Belarus, at that time BSU was not happy about his civil position expressed in numerous interviews and texts. Finally, in 2008 he successfully defended PhD at Vilnius’ academy of fine arts. Name of his thesis was „Representation of Vitebsk’s avant-garde in news-papers of 1920s“. Since 2008 till now (2015) he works as an assistant professor of European Humanities University in Vilnius.(3)
Paranoia
His first novel Paranoia, published in 2009 in Moscow, has been positively reviewed by New York Times Book Reviewin 2009 and 2013. In 2013 North Western university Press in Chicago published English translation of Paranoia, prepared by Diane Nemec Ignashev, Carleton’s professor of Russian literature.
Paranoia is a novel about love in time of dictatorship. The love between a man and a woman is described with freshness, depth, and joy. In the background is the dark, sinister world of authoritarian rule, with its frozen emotions, unspoken truths, and bizarre understanding of reality. The book never mentions Belarus. The dictator is not the president but the secret-service minister, and his character is purposely written to differ from the current Belarusian leader.(4)


___________________________________________________________________________________________
3 Biography of Victor Martinovich: http://martinovich.by/?page_id=2
4 LESHCHENKO, N., 15.1.2010, Belarus: love and paranoia: https://www.opendemocracy.net/natalia-leshchenko/belarus-love-and-paranoia

Lucia Chuda said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lucia Chuda said...


The author, Victor Martinovich, opens the novel with the pointed statement “All characters are fictional.” As a police state, such as today’s Belarusian dictatorship, approaches perfect control - someone is always watching. The young lovers are watching each other, whether they understand this or not.
We can expect that in this book is mentioned a lot of connections with Belarus, for example: A police state is not exactly identified by name, but it is closely based on the author´s native Belarus (and its protagonist´s best-known work is a collection of essays titled: The Country whose Name begins with „B“).
We can see it in Head of State, Commander in Chief, Minister of State Security Nikolai Mikhailovich Muraviov, who plays a big role in the novel, is known as the „last dictator in Europe“, just as the actual Belarusian leader - Alexander Lukashenko.5
His next books, Cold paradise and Sfagmun, are not dystopias, but we may say that they also reflect reality by a lot of symbols and situations.(5)
Cold paradise
In 2011 Victor Martinovich published his second novel Stsyudzyoni vyrai – this means Cold Paradise, it's an interesting religious and ethical concept. Vyrai in popular belief is, on the one hand, a place where birds fly during cold months, and on the other it is where spirits go after the death. So it is a paradise and a warm country at the same time.
The novel starts with an American guy who is writing notes in Belarusian. Of course he makes a lot of mistakes. This guy is a fine arts dealer, who meets a girl from Belarus, and this girl somehow gets him interested in Belarus. As it turns out, she is a dissident hiding from the KGB. To impress her, he starts to learn language (he claims his ancestors are from Belarus). He writes these notes in Belarusian which are published in some literary magazine. Via these notes he tries to invite her to a meeting, but she's in hiding. So he suggests that they meet in Vilnius – and he waits for her every week at the same time in the same café.

___________________________________________________________________________
5 ORTHOFER, M., 29.11.2013 Paranoia by Victor Martinovich : http://www.complete-review.com/reviews/postsu/martinovich.htm

Lucia Chuda said...

This political thriller is full of mistakes that prove this guy is not the person he claims to be.. By writing this novel the author, who although is Belarusian, made a lot of mistakes. But by the end he claims that he was quite fluent in Belarusian: „I found this person in me who is Belarusian-thinking and Belarusian-speaking“.
He received the Maxim Bahdanovich prize for this book and a lot of good reviews. Stsyudzyoni vyrai has never been translated into any language, even into Russian, because it is just too difficult to translate all the mistakes.(6)

Sfagnum
This crime-caper comedy drama is more than a story of a gang’s failure – it’s a truly carnivalesque journey into the metaphysical landscape of the Belarusian provinces. The gang’s heist scheme goes awry: one member tries to steal the loot along the way. He dies in the shooting and the rest of the gang has to run away. The local police officer arrives at the crime scene and finds the loot, quite a sizeable amount of cash. The instructions he gets from his boss are clear: no money should be mentioned in his reports. Three incompetent amateur gangsters end up owing the loot to a high-powered mafia boss and they have only a few days to come up with the cash, with a thug hot on their tail.
The novel, heavy on local dialect and foul language, introduces us to the exotic setting of Belarusian rural life and presents the reader with a vast gallery of vivid characters.
This fast-paced, laugh-out-loud gangster comedy is a perfect blend of humour, intelligence, and suspense from the young Belarusian writer who reflects his own experiences.(7)

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6 GLIŃSKI,M., 8.10.2015, What If Your Language Were an Illegal Drug? An Interview with Victor Martinovich : http://culture.pl/en/article/what-if-your-language-were-an-illegal-drug-an-interview-with-victor-martinovich
7 VASHKEVICH, D., Books from Belarus : http://34mag.net/content/stuff/Books_from_Belarus_print.pdf

Lucia Chuda said...

Mova
The newest of four books is Mova which means in Belarusian „Language“. It is a political thriller, a dystopian vision of the future in which the Belarusian language has disapeared and the rest of it is used as a drug and Poland´s capital is where this drug is distributed.
The book describes Minsk in the near future, around 70 years from now. Minsk is occupied by a Russian-Chinese Empire, but there is not mentioned a Belarus, neither Belarusian words or toponyms of streets. Actually, nobody even remembers the Belarusian language. There is only a small group of junkies who take a drug called Mova. This means they read small samples of classic Belarusian literature to „get high“. The whole system of drug distribution is obviously controlled by the Chinese, through the so-called triads. But the centre of production of the drug is actually Warsaw.
Poland and Warsaw are shown in the book as messy but likeable places without state control where you can buy everything, including this Belarusian drug.
There are two narrators: first is a drug addict, an intellectual and the second narrator is a drug dealer whose job is to travel to Warsaw, buy a lot of drugs and then transport them to the border and trick the border control and their scanners. The problem with this drug is we can only get high by reading a new fragment.
After reading we have to destroy it because it is very dangerous to own these drugs. And then we have to look for another fragment. During perceiving this new language, we begin to make mistakes in Russian – and this is the way for the state to catch us, which is the main problem in this story.
What can we suppose? However, the author does not mention names, there is always an influence which influences a writer to write a story. There are some similarities between fiction and reality. Maybe the author wants to point out a problem which is in real. After Alexander Lukashenko became a president in 1994, Belarus started to be more pro-russian oriented. One consequence of rusification is declaration Russian language as national in Belarus which could lead to stop using Belarusian language.

Lucia Chuda said...

The author declared about his book:
„This work is very controversial, a little scandalous. Despite the fact that it has a strong plot, it does not plot the literature. Hiding under the guise of language "militants", the text tries to answer the vexed questions that have matured in our society. The main of them - language. I tried to make sense of this problem in terms of science fiction.“
Also, he answer a question - Could Mova, that is Belarusian language, be dangerous for the regime today?
„It's not about being dangerous to the regime. I can easily imagine Lukashenka speaking Belarusian. He can – and it's not dangerous for him. It used to be dangerous in 90s when we used to have a strong national front. But we don't have this any more. Lukashenka is the only one there and Belarusian is not dangerous for him – but he still hasn't overcome this fear which Belarusian was causing in the 90s.“(8)


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8 GLIŃSKI,M., 8.10.2015,What If Your Language Were an Illegal Drug? An Interview with Victor Martinovich : http://culture.pl/en/article/what-if-your-language-were-an-illegal-drug-an-interview-with-victor-martinovich




Conclusion

Every book is special because of message, meaning. One hundred peole have different points of view on it. The only right answer on question: If Victor Martinovich really mean Belarus in his novel Paranoia, or if he was thinking about russia-belarusian relations when he was writting a novel Mova, is author´s answer. We can only expect it. But there are some situations when we should polemize about. One example could be that two days after Paranoia hits Minsk bookshops and Belarus’ Internet retailers, it is suddenly “unavailable.” It is as if the book never existed. A novel disappeared.(9)



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9 LESHCHENKO, N., 15.1.2010 Belarus: love and paranoia: https://www.opendemocracy.net/natalia-leshchenko/belarus-love-and-paranoia

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